About Us

All Saints'

‚ÄčAll Saints' Mediaeval Church known as the 'Cathedral of the Marsh' is the centrepiece of Lydd. The church is 199 ft long making it the longest Parish Church in Kent. Its 15th century 132 ft tower features four asymmetrical spires and has 8 well tuned bells the largest weighing over 15 cwt (790kg). In the Middle Ages the church featured several altars as well as at least ten candlelit shrines.  At the corner of the nave is all that remains of a stone Saxon church, or perhaps, a Romano British building, which estabilishes Lydd's existence as sometime before 640AD.
In Victorian times, the church was cluttered with tiered box pews and a high pulpit, the organ was in the present Lady Chapel, the choir stalls situated close to the high altar and the ceiling was of dark oak panelling. In 1887 when soldiers paraded to the church from the army camp, the present pews were installed, enough to seat about 1,200 people (a little squashed!)

lydd tower

 
 
 

In 1940 the chancel of the church was destroyed by a direct bomb hit; the attack occurred at 4.07 pm on the 15th October, which is when the church clock stopped, additional bombing attacks in 1944 caused further damage, and painstaking repairs were made using the original bricks and the existing Chancel Area was re-hallowed during 1958.    
The church has excellent acoustic properties and is equipped with a fine organ installed  during the 1950's refurbishment. The church is equipped with a removable screen for use with a projector if required and has effective sound system. A hearing aid loop system covers most of the seating areas.
 During 2006 a new gas fired heating system was installed, a warm relief after 4 years withour heat.  After much fund raising 2013 sees the installation of a long awaited toilet and kitchen improving the facilities.

chancel

St Peter's

St Peter's started in 1953 as a wooden hall situated a little further up Baldwin Rd than the present church building in the days when most of Greatstone was shingle and sand dunes, with only a few houses, a railway station, and a holiday camp that had started just after World War Two. Although Greatstone is part of the Parish and Borough of Lydd as it was six miles from Lydd town the need for a more local place of worship was identified.
The present building was made possible by a generous bequest and was open in April 1962 by Michael Ramsey, Archbishop of Canterbury.  The shape of the building is intended to reflect the shape of a boat - being the symbol of the disciple Peter, to whom it is dedicated. The east end is rounded to be like the bow and the west end is cut off square to be the stern.

 

In recent years the pews which originally came from All Saints' have been replaced with comfortable chairs and the original parquet flooring, carpeted. A new fireproof ceiling has been put in replacing the broken polystyrene tiles and allowing for decent insulation.
There is an effective sound system and hearing aid loop and in November 2011 a projector was installed and so services are now shown on the screen.

In June 2014 we replaced the old wooden doors at the South entrance with new
oak glazed doors - giving a more open aspect into the Church

Halls

Each church has hall facilities:-

Hardy Hall Lydd situated on the corner of the Rype (a large open green area) close to the town centre & church.

St Peter's Hall Greatstone adjacent to the church.